Imaging Japanese Religion in the Classroom: Mandala, Manga, Pizza, and Gardens

Abstract

How does my research influence my pedagogy? As a teacher of Japanese religions at a small liberal arts college, I realized long ago that I wasn’t teaching in grad school. Few of my students can speak or read Japanese or have ever traveled to Japan. So, chances are I’m not going to be teaching a small seminar on pre-modern Buddhist pilgrimage focusing on original texts in the classical vernacular. Yet, in teaching undergraduates, I keep Shunryu Suzuki’s comment in mind: “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s there are few.” The trick is how to trigger those possibilities. How do I open the door to a subject that is totally new and perhaps even strange? What do I find so fascinating in my own research that will also fascinate my students?

How to Cite

Williams, M.M., 2009. Imaging Japanese Religion in the Classroom: Mandala, Manga, Pizza, and Gardens. ASIANetwork Exchange: A Journal for Asian Studies in the Liberal Arts, 16(2), pp.86–103. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/ane.226

Downloads

Download PDF

256

Views

144

Downloads

Share

Authors

Mark Mac Williams (St. Lawrence University)

Download

Issue

Publication details

Dates

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0

Identifiers

Peer Review

This article has been peer reviewed.

File Checksums (MD5)

  • PDF: 8332ed699fb723507de8f8b8ad289b5c